Follow Us

Follow on Twitter    Follow on Facebook    YouTube Channel    Vimeo Channel    SoundCloud Channel    iPhone App    iPhone App
post image

Intervention, Libya, Jadaliyya: A Documentary Remix

The following is an audio-visual documentary remix by VJ Um Amel of "On International Intervention and the Dire Situation in Libya," an article by Asli Bali and Ziad Abu-Rish originally published on Jadaliyya on February 23, 2011. See video below.   Read More »

post image

Don't Blame the King for Islamophobia, Blame the Kingdom

Peter King and the Homeland Security Committee’s hearings on the radicalization of American Muslims are upon us. Mainstream op-ed pieces have increasingly suggested the "divisiveness" of this New McCarthyism, especially after the Southern Poverty Law Center listed Robert Spencer and Pamela Geller’s Stop ...  Read More »

post image

الخروج من الميدان [Exiting the Square]

لم نكن نسمع بكلمة «ثورة» سوى في الكتب والأفلام. الثورة الفرنسية، الثورة البلشفية، الثورة الإسلامية، الثورة الثقافية، الثورة الكوبية، ثورة الطلبة... كل ثورة كانت تزيد مهابة الكلمة، وتجعلها ـــــ بفضل جسامة أحداثها وعظمة أفكارها، ثم ما آلت إليه مصائرها ــ مشحونةً وملتبسة. وشقّت الكلمة حياةً لها في مخيّلاتنا. كانت الثورة ...  Read More »

post image

The Peter King "Radicalization of Muslims" Hearing and American Democracy

Republicans clearly think that they have found a political winner in Muslim-bashing. Peter King, Republican representative from New York’s Third Congressional District (in Long Island), is the new chair of the House Homeland Security Committee. He was way ahead of the Muslim-bashing curve. Most Republicans didn’t get ...  Read More »

post image

"The Poetry of Revolt" by Elliott Colla Nominated for Award - Vote Now!

We are very excited that Elliott Colla's article, "The Poetry of Revolt," (published by Jadaliyya on January 31, 2011), has just been nominated for the Three Quarks Daily Prize in Arts and Literature. Show your support of Elliott Colla's piece and Jadaliyya by participating in the public voting for ...  Read More »

post image

Iraq Too?

Many cast doubts that the lung through which Tunisia breathed freedom could give birth to kindred lungs in Arab lands to the east or west. Even after Egypt shook the earth to dethrone its last Pharaoh, doubts were cast again as to the mobility of the phenomenon. Then came Libya, which is on the verge of casting away ...  Read More »

post image

And the Late Night Comedians Shall Lead Us

For those of you lucky readers who are able to access Al Jazeera or Al Arabiya on your televisions, you can stop reading now. This is for those of us, in the US, who either have to sleep with our laptops streaming the “real” news or who, for fear that our batteries may die, have to set our cell phone alarm clocks to ...  Read More »

post image

The Fabric of Democracy

When disturbed, they usually escape by running and rarely take to flight. (The Common Peacock) In Rogues, his 2003 volume on rogue states,[1] Jacques Derrida looked to Plato's Republic in order to assess the Grecian syntagma of democracy as ‘democracy to come.’ Passages from the Republic referring to ...  Read More »

post image

من يخاف من أحلام جعفر بناهي؟ [Who is Afraid of Jafar Panahi's Dreams?]

 ست سنوات سجن وعدم مزاولة الإخراج لعشرين عاماً وعدم الاتصال بالصحفين هي بعض الأحكام الصادرة بحق المخرج الإيراني جعفر بناهي (ت. 1960) ومجموعة من زملاءه عن محكمة إيرانية في العشرين من ديسمبر الماضي. والتهمة المساقة هي تشويه صورة إيران والقيام بدعاية مغرضة ضد النظام. نظام يبدو أنه أفلس إلى هذه الدرجة فأصبح يخاف من ...  Read More »

post image

Bad Faith at the Book Festival

“Everywhere you look the boycott debate is in the news,” Joseph Dana notes in a recent article on his blog. The most prominent example involves British novelist Ian McEwan, who rejected calls to boycott the 2011 Jerusalem Book Festival after being awarded the Jerusalem Prize. Instead, McEwan, in his acceptance speech ...  Read More »

post image

Map of Libya According to Qaddafi Imagi-Nation

[This cartoon was prepared after Qaddafi's third speech on February 25, in which he equated Libya with himself . . . ]  Read More »

post image

Qaddafi: "Song of the Rain"

  This cartoon in Arabic is about Qaddafi's speech last night in response to the Libyan people's revolution which is at its height this week. Amid rumors that he fled to Venezuela and much news that the Libyan people have secured control on many of the cities, to give a speech and claim that he is still in ...  Read More »

post image

Egypt: A Multi-Generational Revolt

In the mainstream Western and Arab media, Egypt’s revolution is often presented as a revolution of the youth. While it is true that young activists planned the January 25th demonstrations and organized and raised support throughout much of the process leading up to that day, this uprising would not have ...  Read More »

post image

The Marriage of Sexism and Islamophobia; Re-Making the News on Egypt

I find myself intermittently infuriated and nauseated by the news coverage of the sexual assault on a female CBS reporter in Tahrir Square during the celebrations the day that Husni Mubarak resigned. This coverage has ranged from the disappointing silence of Al-Jazeera to the blatant racism of Fox News. What ...  Read More »

post image

How Egyptian Women Took Back the Street Between Two “Black Wednesdays”: A First Person Account

On February 16, Roger Ebert, an American film critic and commentator, tweeted: "The attack on Lara Logan brings Middle East attitudes toward women into sad focus." While the attack on CBS News correspondent Lara Logan was a tragic and upsetting event, it needs to be understood in its political context. ...  Read More »

post image

What If the Egyptian Protesters Were Democrats?

Their recent upheaval would certainly have been different, perhaps dramatically different.  In the past month, the people of Egypt—inspired by the recent democratic revolution in Tunisia and preceding emergent revolutions in Libya, Algeria, Bahrain, Jordan, Yemen, and Syria—have undertaken a revolt of truly ...  Read More »

post image

A Word on Africa: Djibouti

“Arab world unrest reaches Horn of Africa” was how the Israeli website Ynet led off its coverage of the demonstrations that began in Djibouti yesterday. On Friday, thousands of protesters — 6,000, according to the Independent, in a country with a population of less than a million people — demanded the resignation of ...  Read More »

post image

Morocco on the Eve of the Demonstrations

“When I go out in the street, no cares about #feb20, I connect and boom, the revolution is brewing” (Qd je sors ds la rue, no one cares about #feb20, je me connecte et boom c'est la révolution qui couve). The above, tweeted yesterday in the style of much that’s being produced on the internet about the demonstrations ...  Read More »

post image

Iraq and Its Tahrir Square

[This article is a slightly updated and edited translation of the original Arabic version that was posted on Jadaliyya and can be found here.] Iraq’s absence from the “Egypt Today, Tomorrow the World” map, published a week after the massive demonstration in Egypt on January 25th and which included the dates of ...  Read More »

post image

King Abdullah Announces a Discount for Dictators

Two Arab dictators are out of the game, but there are others. Here is a cartoon by Khalil Bendib about possible efforts to accomodate future ex-presidents.     Read More »

post image

Iranians In Solidarity with Egyptians and Tunisians Need Your Support, Now

While celebrating the exhilarating achievements of the popular democratic uprisings in Tunisia and Egypt, I have also been consumed with a restless hope and deepening concern for Iranians with parallel dreams of realizing a free and democratic society. Iranian pro-democracy activists and opposition figures Mir Hossein ...  Read More »

post image

The Long Shadow of the 1952 Revolution

Almost exactly fifty-nine years ago, on January 26, 1952, downtown Cairo was in flames. Cinemas, department stores, and hotels were set alight by rioters in the streets. The identity of these rioters would become the focus of enormous speculation: Were they revolutionaries who sought the expulsion of British colonial ...  Read More »

post image

Egypt's Revolution 2.0: The Facebook Factor

The call for a Day of Rage on January 25, 2011 that ignited the Egyptian revolution originated from a Facebook page. Many have since asked: Is this a “Facebook Revolution?”  It is high time to put this question to rest and insist that political and social movements belong to people and not to communication tools ...  Read More »

post image

Imperial Feminism, Islamophobia, and the Egyptian Revolution

". . . I’m making this video to give you one simply message: We want to go down to Tahrir Square on January 25. If we still have honor and want to live with dignity on this land, we have to go down on January 25. We’ll go down and demand our rights, our fundamental human rights...The entire government is ...  Read More »

post image

New word added to Oxford Dictionary: Mubarak (v.): To stick something, or to glue something

[Circulating in the Egyptian Public Space] New word added to Oxford Dictionary:  Mubarak (v.): To stick something, or to glue something.  Example: “I will punch you and mubarak you to the wall”; or “You can mubarak the pieces to hold them together”.     لوحات طريفة يحملها المعتصمون في ...  Read More »

post image

From the Blogosphere to the Street: The Role of Social Media in the Egyptian Uprising

While the uprising in Egypt caught most observers of the Middle East off guard, it did not come out of the blue. The seeds of this spectacular mobilization had been sown as far back as the early 2000s and had been carefully cultivated by activists from across the political spectrum, many of these working online via ...  Read More »

post image

Non-Negotiable

The naysayers who had been suggesting (or, in some cases, hoping) that the protests in Egypt were running out of steam have been proven wrong, once again, by the Egyptian people. By some accounts, the crowds in Midan Tahrir today were the largest yet — “hundreds of thousands,” according to the Guardian’s live reports ...  Read More »

post image

Why Egypt's Progressives Win

On 6 February 2011, Egypt’s hastily appointed Vice President Omar Suleiman invited in the old guard or what we could call the Businessmen’s Wing of the Muslim Brothers into a stately meeting in the polished rosewood Cabinet Chamber of Mubarak’s Presidential Palace. The aim of their tea party was to discuss some kind ...  Read More »

post image

Revolutionary Contagion: Morocco and a Plea for Specificity

Since January 15th, media discourse on the Arab world has almost uniformly coalesced around a single term, “contagion.” This is a telling semantic choice given the word’s broader associations with disease; a synonym for “infection” or “contamination,” it carries rhetorical connotations that are hardly subtle. The Wall ...  Read More »

post image

State Culture, State Anarchy

Mubarak told Christiane Amanpour that Egyptian “culture” was anarchic in nature—and that chaos would break out if he stepped down. So, Egyptians are barbaric and can be tamed only by the strong hand of a loving father—what else is new? This is not just what Lord Cromer used to say, it is exactly what the autumnal ...  Read More »

Page 50 of 50     « First   ...   44   45   46   47   48   49   50